NHỮNG IDIOMS CỰC HAY CHO IELTS SPEAKING TEST


 

1. Make a beeline for

Meaning:

Go rapidly and directly towards.

Origin:

The bee was supposed to fly in a such a way when returning to its hive.

In a sentence:

The hungry tourists made a beeline for the buffet that featured delicious food from all over the world.

 

2. Jump (or climb) on the bandwagon

Meaning:

Join others in doing or supporting something fashionable or likely to be successful.

Origin:

Bandwagon was originally the US term for a large wagon able to carry a band in a procession.

In a sentence:

When your TV show does extremely well, advertisers will be competing to be the first to jump on the bandwagon.

 

3. Off (or way off) beam

Meaning:

On the wrong track; mistaken.

Origin:

Originally, referring to the radio beam or signal used to guide aircraft. The opposite is on the beam.

In a sentence:

I lost the bet as my prediction was way off beam.

 

4. At someone’s beck and call

Meaning:

Always having to be ready to obey someone’s orders immediately.

Origin:

Beck in the sense of “significant gesture of command” comes from the verb beck, which is shortened form of beckon and is now found mainly in this phrase.

In a sentence:

She is going to be confined to a wheelchair for the next three weeks but she’s not complaining as she will have a nurse at her beck and call.

 

5. Pass (or hand) (on) the baton

Meaning:

Hand over a particular duty or responsibility.

Origin:

A metaphor from athletics: the baton is the short stick or rod passed from one runner to the next in a relay race. Thus, to take up (or pick up) the baton is to accept a duty or responsibility.

In a sentence:

Susan has passed the baton after 40 years at the helm of the biggest technology company in the region.

 

6. Work like a beaver

Meaning:

Work steadily and industriously.

Origin:

The beaver is proverbial for the industriousness with which it constructs the dams necessary for its aquatic dwellings.

In a sentence:

She worked like a beaver to empty the house as the new tenant will be moving in tomorrow.

 

7. Bed of nails

Meaning:

A problematic or uncomfortable situation.

Origin:

Originally a board with nails pointing out of it, as used by Eastern fakirs and ascetics.

In a sentence:

My parents are very judgemental and living with them can be a bed of nails.

 

8. Beat a (hasty) retreat

Meaning:

Withdraw, typically to avoid something unpleasant.

Origin:

Formerly in a military context, a drumbeat could be used to keep soldiers in step while retreating.

In a sentence:

David beat a retreat when he saw his ex-girlfriend walk into the wedding party with another man.

 

9. Beggar on horseback

Meaning:

A formerly poor person made arrogant or corrupt through achieving wealth and luxury.

Origin:

The proverbial saying set a beggar on horseback and he’ll ride to the devil.

In a sentence:

It’s not surprising that he lost everything and is being investigated by the authorities as he was a beggar on a horseback.

 

10. A whole new ball game

Meaning:

A completely new set of circumstances.

Origin:

Ball game in North America refers to a game of baseball.

In a sentence:

After Sarah joined the Marketing team as General Manager, it was a whole new ball game.